Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker Review

Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker : The Fitbit Surge is the organization’s first authentic sports monitoring wearable aimed at individuals who love jogging, cycling and exercising. Fitbit has described that the Surge as its “most sophisticated tracker so far,” along with optical heartbeat sensing and GPS built-in, it is more than a game for sports watches from likes of Garmin and also Polar.

The Fitbit Surge is a ‘super exercise watch,’ but just what does that mean?  Well, it is an action tracker the same as the Charge and Charge HR, utilizing the same movement sensors.  So that you may track measures, distance covered and also automatically monitor sleep patterns.

To take a bite from this congested sports watch marketplace, the Surge also supplies built-in GPS and an optical heartbeat sensor, which makes it a fantastic match for runners, cyclists or anybody who wants that additional layer of biometric information.

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The Fitbit Surge Fitness tracker is priced at £200, placing it up from the Polar M400, the Garmin Vivo active and sports watches Such as the Center rate-tracking Tom Tom Runner Cardio. It is the most expensive part of these Fitbit family members, and while it is the most feature-packed apparatus yet, it geared toward the casual athlete, not just a person who’s preparing for a marathon.

Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker Review

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Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker – Design & Features:

Unlike Fitbit Zip along with also the Fitbit Flex which came before it, the Surge shuns the conventional action tracker band form variable, and it is certainly more smartwatch than a fitness Unlike Fitbit Zip along with also the Fitbit Flex which came before it, the Surge shuns the conventional action tracker band form variable, and it is certainly more smartwatch than a fitness tracker.But while the Android Wear brigade are scarcely fashionista head-turners (the LG Watch R and the Asus Zen Watch are semi-stylish instead of stunning) that they do marginally place the Surge to pity when it comes to aesthetics.

The watch is in a wedge shape, which is comfy if a little sweaty with its rubber strap. The Fitbit’s rubber strap that comes in black, blue or blue tangerine looks beautiful enough also, crucially, is equally comfortable and secure, but it ‘s hard to check beyond that obsolete appearing display and the rise in girth in the depths underside to top end is quite eccentric.

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The screen is a somewhat drab looking touch-screen 1.25-inch LCD number which employs plenty of grayish blue variations because of its distinct home screens and menus.  There is a separate button on the left side for switching between the active view style of your everyday stats along with the function displays (that also switches out of the light on dark to dark on light color setup) along with both buttons on the right used as pick controls.

This capacitive control arrangement works nicely yet; it’s simple to navigate around the Surge’s choices and features without becoming lost, and we have had absolutely no problems using touch screen responsiveness, even in the pouring rain.

The LCD has a backlight so that it’s also usable in low light situations — it is possible to toggle this lighting off or on, or put it to automatically come on when in use — via the settings menu to your device itself instead of having to use the program.

If you would like to alter the watch face — there is four to pick from — you don’t need to work with the program, the settings on your device just stretch into the backlight, changing alarms on or off, toggling Bluetooth, putting the heartbeat monitoring power alternatives and turning the Surge off. Unlike Fitbit Zip along with also the Fitbit Flex which came before it, the Surge shuns the conventional action tracker band form variable, and it is certainly more smartwatch than a fitness tracker.But while the Android Wear brigade are scarcely fashionista head-turners (the LG Watch R and the Asus Zen Watch are semi-stylish instead of stunning) that they do marginally place the Surge to pity when it comes to aesthetics.

 

The watch is in a wedge shape, which is comfy if a little sweaty with its rubber strap. The Fitbit’s rubber strap that comes in black, blue or blue tangerine looks beautiful enough also, crucially, is equally comfortable and secure, but it ‘s hard to check beyond that obsolete appearing display and the rise in girth in the depths underside to top end is quite eccentric.

The screen is a somewhat drab looking touch-screen 1.25-inch LCD number which employs plenty of grayish blue variations because of its distinct home screens and menus.  There is a separate button on the left side for switching between the active view style of your everyday stats along with the function displays (that also switches out of the light on dark to dark on light color setup) along with both buttons on the right used as pick controls.

This capacitive control arrangement works nicely yet; it’s simple to navigate around the Surge’s choices and features without becoming lost, and we have had absolutely no problems using touch screen responsiveness, even in the pouring rain.

The LCD has a backlight so that it’s also usable in low light situations — it is possible to toggle this lighting off or on, or put it to automatically come on when in use — via the settings menu to your device itself instead of having to use the program.

If you would like to alter the watch face — there is four to pick from — you don’t need to work with the program, the settings on your device just stretch into the backlight, changing alarms on or off, toggling Bluetooth, putting the heartbeat monitoring power alternatives and turning the Surge off. Unlike Fitbit Zip along with also the Fitbit Flex which came before it, the Surge shuns the conventional action tracker band form variable, and it is certainly more smartwatch than a fitness tracker. But while the Android Wear brigade are scarcely fashionista head-turners (the LG Watch R and the Asus Zen Watch are semi-stylish instead of stunning) that they do marginally place the Surge to pity when it comes to aesthetics.

The watch is in a wedge shape, which is comfy if a little sweaty with its rubber strap. The Fitbit’s rubber strap that comes in black, blue or blue tangerine looks beautiful enough also, crucially, is equally comfortable and secure, but it ‘s hard to check beyond that obsolete appearing display and the rise in girth in the depths underside to top end is quite eccentric.

The screen is a somewhat drab looking touch-screen 1.25-inch LCD number which employs plenty of grayish blue variations because of its distinct home screens and menus.  There is a separate button on the left side for switching between the active view styles of your everyday stats along with the function displays (that also switches out of the light on dark to dark on light color setup) along with both buttons on the right used as pick controls.

This capacitive control arrangement works nicely yet; it’s simple to navigate around the Surge’s choices and features without becoming lost, and we have had absolutely no problems using touch screen responsiveness, even in the pouring rain.

The LCD has a backlight so that it’s also usable in low light situations — it is possible to toggle this lighting off or on, or put it to automatically come on when in use — via the settings menu to your device itself instead of having to use the program.

If you would like to alter the watch face — there is four to pick from — you don’t need to work with the program, the settings on your device just stretch into the backlight, changing alarms on or off, toggling Bluetooth, putting the heartbeat monitoring power alternatives and turning the Surge off.tracker. But while the Android Wear brigade are scarcely fashionista head-turners (the LG Watch R and the Asus Zen Watch are semi-stylish instead of stunning) that they do marginally place the Surge to pity when it comes to aesthetics.

The watch is in a wedge shape, which is comfy if a little sweaty with its rubber strap. The Fitbit’s rubber strap that comes in black, blue or blue tangerine looks beautiful enough also, crucially, is equally comfortable and secure, but it ‘s hard to check beyond that obsolete appearing display and the rise in girth in the depths underside to top end is quite eccentric.

The screen is a somewhat drab looking touch-screen 1.25-inch LCD number which employs plenty of grayish blue variations because of its distinct home screens and menus.  There is a separate button on the left side for switching between the active view style of your everyday stats along with the function displays (that also switches out of the light on dark to dark on light color setup) along with both buttons on the right used as pick controls.

This capacitive control arrangement works nicely yet; it’s simple to navigate around the Surge’s choices and features without becoming lost, and we have had absolutely no problems using touch screen responsiveness, even in the pouring rain.

The LCD has a backlight so that it’s also usable in low light situations — it is possible to toggle this lighting off or on, or put it to automatically come on when in use — via the settings menu to your device itself instead of having to use the program.

If you would like to alter the watch face — there is four to pick from — you don’t need to work with the program, the settings on your device just stretch into the backlight, changing alarms on or off, toggling Bluetooth, putting the heartbeat monitoring power alternatives and turning the Surge off.

Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker: Activity, Sleep Tracking & Heart Monitoring:

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The Fitbit Surge fitness tracker is capable of tracking Measures, distance traveled, calories burned, floors climbed, elevation and Busy Moments thanks to the 3-axis accelerometer, a 3-axis gyroscope, and digital compass.

These stats are Not Just synced to the Fitbit Program But can also be displayed on the device’s screen.  In the normal clock face you swipe, and you will see all of your daily totals on screen.  It is unbelievably user-friendly and less fiddly than opening an app to understand how you are doing, as might be the case with old Fitbit apparatus, in addition to incoming opponents such as the Jawbone UP3.

The activity tracking is, as you would expect from a company with lots of experience within this region, incredibly dependable (it is tested against old Fitbit versions, in addition to rival action bands) as well as the Surge does a fantastic job of inspiring as a result of the simplicity of seeing just how well you’re performing against your objectives.

There is also sleep tracking together with the entire Surge and, such as the newest Fitbit Charge versions, your zzzs will be tracked automatically (unlike the old Flex that necessitated a manual, push of a switch sleep control) and there is a vibration-based silent alert on supply also. The Surge records days of comprehensive movement information, minute by minute, and keeps tabs on your daily totals for a few month.  It May also stores Heartbeat data at 1-second Periods during Workout tracking and every 5 seconds in all other times.

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24/7 heartbeat monitoring, utilizing Fit bit’s brand new Pure Pulse technology (which can be found from the Fitbit Charge), which is a significant quality of the Surge and sets the device straight from the likes of this Basis Peak along with the Microsoft Band.

Fitbit surge fitness tracker ensures that, not only are you able to use the built-in optical heartbeat sensor to direct you during workouts and runs, and permit you to do detailed bpm coaching, you could even track your resting heartbeat every day, letting you track it over time and observe what events and actions in your daily life make it alter.

Fitbit’s Pure Pulse Technology uses LED lights (you’ll see them around the rear flashing green as you eliminate the Surge) to detect your blood vessels Quantity changes since the heart beats and, together with the organization’s algorithms, You are going to have the ability to acquire a more precise calorie burn figure and also maintain a closer eye On your wellbeing

So while an optical, wrist-based, heartbeat monitoring is not likely to be as precise as a committed chest-strap, we would say that the Surge is as dependable as anyone of its most famous rivals for an overall indicator of bpm performance.

Fitbit Surge Fitness tracker  Smart Watch Notifications

The Surge connects to Pc with a Bluetooth USB dongle, but also wirelessly into your Smartphone and the Fitbit Program Accessible for Android, iPhone and Windows Phone. The watch can also display call and text alarms, in addition to basic music commands for the default audio player in an iPhone or even Android apparatus that work nicely enough.

Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker Battery Life and Extras

Fitbit appears confused about two things when it concerns about Surge: Battery life and water resistance.  On the Surge’s official page it says that the battery life is just “up to 5 days” and “7+ times”.  You do not have to be a genius to work out that does not make sense.  We have just over three full days from it, but that didn’t contain one hour or so a day of GPS based action.  It charges from a connector attached to your USB cable — annoyingly not the same connector as the Fitbit Charge, though.

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The Surge carries a water resistant score of 5ATM, which ought to mean that you’d have no problems wearing it from the pool – though Fitbit advises against it.  That does not make sense for a 5ATM rating means that it must withstand the strain of 50m of water.

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Fitbit Surge Fitness Tracker  Price

The Fitbit Surge fitness tracker prices £199 and are available in black, orange and blue.  Competitors like the Basis Peak price £150, while high-end fitness watches price upwards of £250.

Pros: Strong battery life, constant heartbeat monitoring, altimeter, precise measure monitoring, easy to read display.

Cons:  Occasional syncing difficulties, bad data analysis, irregular heartbeat during run, chunky, bad sleep tracking.

The Fitbit Surge fitness tracker is not the most popular physical fitness tracker, but it might only be among the greatest advanced options on the market.  I like the ability to swipe the screen to look at all of my most recent calories, measures and distance count, along with also the heart-rate monitor is excellent to have if you are resting. If you are a casual workout fan, you may spring for a different, cheaper Fitbit version, but if you would like the widest variety of features along with the advantages of Fitbit’s  surge fitness tracker great applications, this can be a good option.

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